Beach-at-Halawa Molokai
Island of Molokai

Island of Molokai

Molokai Area: 673.4 km² Population: 7,404 (2000) Highest elevation: 4,961 ft (1,512.1 m) Largest settlement: Kaunakakai History Molokai is a Hawaiian island in the central Pacific. Molokai was long inhabited by self-sufficient taro growers and fishermen. In the 18th century the kingdom of Oahu gained control over Molokai; its rule lasted until 1785, when warriors from Maui and Hawaii islands invaded and separately ruled the island. Hawaiian chief Kamehameha I invaded in 1795 and subordinated the population as part of his effort to unify the Hawaiian Islands. Christian missionaries arrived on Molokai in the 1830s. A large ranch was established by Kamehameha V, but this destroyed much of the island’s plant life and fishing ponds. By the 1860s a colony had been begun for victims of leprosy (Hansen disease), and this led to the forced resettlement of many of the island’s natives, particularly from the Kalaupapa Peninsula, in the 1860s and 1890s. The Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1921 encouraged homesteading and resettlement on Molokai. Lack of water slowed development, but after 1923, with the growth of the pineapple industry, small villages grew up on the plateau. The economy of the island suffered a setback in the 1970s and 1980s…

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National Memorial Cemetary of the Pacific –
Punchbowl Cemetery

Punchbowl Cemetery

Punchbowl Cemetery - National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific Few national cemeteries can compete with the dramatic natural setting of the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. Commonly knows as Punchbowl Cemetery or Punchbowl Memorial, the bowl was formed some 75,000 to 100,000 years ago during the Honolulu period of secondary volcanic activity. A crater resulted from the ejection of hot lava through cracks in the old coral reefs which, at the time, extended to the foot of the Koolau Mountain Range. Punchbowl Cemetary Virtual Tour on Memorial Day Dave took his panoramic pole when visited Punchbowl on Memorial Day with our 4 Year Old.  These pictures were taken after the official memorial day ceremonies had ended. Punchbowl Memorial History During the late 1890s, a committee recommended that the Punchbowl become the site for a new cemetery to accommodate the growing population of Honolulu. The idea was rejected for fear of polluting the water supply and the emotional aversion to creating a city of the dead above a city of the living Fifty years later, Congress authorized a small appropriation to establish a national cemetery in Honolulu with two provisions: that the location be acceptable to the War Department, and…

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Hawaii Panoramas
Hawaiian Railway Society: Parlor Car 64

Hawaiian Railway Society: Parlor Car 64

Hawaiian Railway Society: Parlor Car 64 In 1900, Oahu Railway & Land Co. founder, Benjamin F. Dillingham, had Parlor/Observation Car No. 64 designed and built especially for himself. No. 64 was the showpiece of the OR&L's rolling stock. Built in Honolulu at a cost of $4,388.24, it had a double-size rear platform surrounded by ornate iron grill work and protected from the sun by fluted awnings. Oak, mahogany and birds eye maple created an interior of luxury. The parlor car was fitted with a galley, lavatory, washstand and sideboard. It was used frequently by the OR&L for visiting dignitaries. The most notable guests were members of the Hawaiian royal family. The observation platform offered guests a chance to feel the cool trade winds, as well as giving them a better view of the landscape. No. 64 has been restored and is available for charter. The Locomotive 302 One of Hawaiian Railway's operational locomotives, this 300 horsepower Whitcomb diesel electric is used to pull the passenger and work trains. Built: 1944 Weight: 45 tons B-B. Donated by the military in Hawaii. About Hawaiian Railway Society The Hawaiian Railway Society works to save Hawaii's rich railroad history. This educational, non-profit organization was…

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